Monthly Archives: April 2014

Scriptural Heartburn: Hearing and Telling on the Road to Emmaus

    Were not our hearts burning within us while he was talking to us on the road, while he was opening the scriptures to us?

Watch and Wonder

Luke 24:13-35
as told by Rev. Leslianne Braunstein

 

Watch and TELL

Use the video below to practice speaking the dialogue of the story.
How will you portray the characters feelings as you read?

 

BREAK IT down

New to storytelling? Storytelling with kids? Why not learn just the ending this week? What if 3/4 of the way through reading the story, you looked up from the Bible and finished the story by telling it? Here is the ending: Luke 24 end.

Here is a link to the full text (thanks to GoTell Communications): Luke 24:13-35.

Getting SOCIAL

Faith and Wonder is on Facebook and Twitter! Please like and share. I will be utilizing those accounts to do some real-time story learning in the near future!

The Resurrection Story: as seen and told by women

WATCH and WONDER

Matthew 28: 1-10, 16-20
as told by “ByHeart”–Shelley Gnade and Mary-beth Howard (beginning at 2:30)
with opening commentary by Dr. Tom Boomershine
a video produced by The Seed Company in conjunction with the Network of Biblical Storytellers

For more of the Seed Company/NBS stories click HERE.

telling TOGETHER

Shelley and Mary-beth are an incredible storytelling duo based out of Delaware. They are amazing. I am always inspired by what happens when the story is told by more than one person.  I had my first experience of actually doing it at the NEXT Church conference–Jeff Krehbiel and I told a story together. My initial preparations were done alone. When Jeff and I got together to practice, I was amazed by the new things I saw/experienced in the text because of the space that was made present in telling it together.

For all ages: Try telling this story (or another) with a partner! Read the story aloud a few times, and begin by remembering it TOGETHER (in your own words).

For the younger set: Grown ups and kids tell together. For the folks with really young children–start simple–read the story aloud and give them a cue when it’s time to say “DO NOT BE AFRAID!”

Here is the story broken up for telling (CEB):  Matthew 28: 1-10, 16-20.

 

Raising Lazarus through Story (Kids tell John 11)

WATCH and WONDER

Kids tell John 11:38-44

 

WEEK 5 WORSHIP STATIONS

Our texts for this week were Ezekiel 37:1-14 and John 11:38-44. Along with watching the two story videos, the worship stations focused on God “making all things new,” (Rev. 21:5). 
It was sort of a catch-all kind of night…as it was to be our last supper for the season, we wanted to incorporate something of Holy Week and Easter.

dry bones kids

CREATIVE LISTENING While watching Ezekiel 37, kids were invited to draw in the aisle. I explained to them what I had experienced at the NEXT Church conference thanks to the incredible pastor/artist Shawna Bowman. At the close of my NEXT talk, as I told a personal story and Ecclesiastes 3, Shawna created. I wanted the kids to have something of this experience. We put paper and crayons down the center aisle, away we went!

Dry bones art

 I think it was helpful that they had heard the story already the previous Sunday. It was also discussed in the children’s time during worship (though this somehow morphed momentarily into a discussion on zombies).

 

PRAYER WALL In our final week, we did not write down prayers…we offered prayer for prayers. Each person was invited to take down a few prayers from the wall and plant it in the soil in our flower pots. Flowers will be planted on top of the prayers. (At the Western Wall in Jerusalem, prayers are periodically removed and planted in the ground.) When planting, people were invited to  pray for others and ask God to make us all new. (I kept the stations a little more simple this week…watching two videos would occupy more time than usual.

Lent 5 prayer wall

STORY TIME Participants were invited to tell each other stories of Easter. (Yes, it’s that simple–just tell a story.)

GLOBAL PRAYERS At the right is a poster that I made with the kids at the start of Lent (in our Sunday school Making all things new posterprogram)–the idea was taken from Flame: Creative Children’s Ministry. The poster was displayed above our “Global Prayers” station.

New Earth GlobeFor our Global Prayers this week, participants were invited to coat the world with glitter-filled Mod Podge while thanking God for making all things new.

ROCK WORDS For our final week with our rocks, participants were asked to pick a rock word and take it home with them–placing it in a plastic Easter egg–to be hidden and found on Easter morning.

PATCHWORK “QUILT” Someone randomly dropped off a huge bag of paint chips for church school. We decided to make something new–a paper quilt. Everyone took a square and drew symbols of Easter. The quilt will be displayed on Easter morning.

LAST SUPPER We actually made this during our intergenerational education experience the previous week, but it was finished and displayed for the worship station time–and I just love it. Kids were invited to paint themselves into the Last Supper scene. I used three large canvas pieces and painted a table at the bottom and Jesus in the center. I then penciled in circles for heads (just to give some placement help to kids). I wasn’t in the room when they added themselves in (as well as a sun!)–when I saw their finished portraits, it took my breath away. This was a wonderful activity that definitely could have been done as a worship station. Because they are on canvas, we can always add another leaf to the table…I think Jesus would like that.

Last Supper kids Painting

I am done with the children’s videos for a while, and going back to the story-learning blog format…but I am sure the kids will be back to tell more stories soon enough!

 

Can these stories live?

WATCH and WONDER

Ezekiel 37:1-14
as told by David Aland

that ALL should TELL

Dave is a member of the congregation I serve. As you can see, he is awesome. This Lent, we have had storytellers in worship each Sunday–and none of them have been me! It has been awesome to watch others tell. They all bring their own talents and voices, which adds so much to our worship experience. It is incredibly important to engage OTHERS in the telling of biblical stories. It benefits the whole church. (I am hoping to get to record the other congregants who’ve told soon!)

The story itself is a beautiful but strange one. Dave was trying to tell it in a way that captured the text’s mystery, but didn’t sound ridiculous. (As far as I’m concerned he succeeded in every way.) But when he first approached the text, he could not help but want to go to crazy-prophet-mode. So in his preparation, he went ahead and entertained his family by telling it in his crazy-prophet-voice so that he could get it out of his system. He is right on the mark–when you are preparing to tell a story–try out lots of different ways of telling. Sometimes it will help you overcome blocks. Sometimes it will lead you to unexpected truths. Who knows what truths you will uncover along the way….

 

Telling our way to Jerusalem


WATCH and WONDER

Matthew 21:1-11
as told by Rev. Jeff Krehbiel

 THE “MIT”

When learning a story by heart, it is helpful to have a clear idea of what the “Most Important Thing” (MIT) is for your story. Stand up and read Matthew 21 aloud while walking around a few times. What is your initial sense of the MIT for the story?

I am struck with the ties Matthew makes to the Hebrew Testament. After Jesus gives instructions to his disciples (go get a donkey, etc.), Matthew then reminds us of  Zecharaiah 9:9:

Rejoice greatly, O daughter Zion!
    Shout aloud, O daughter Jerusalem!
Lo, your king comes to you;
    triumphant and victorious is he,
humble and riding on a donkey,
    on a colt, the foal of a donkey.

Consider the phrase that leads into it: “This took place to fulfill what had been spoken through the prophet….” According to Matthew, Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem is a fulfillment of Scripture. This includes the way he gets there: Jesus comes into Jerusalem from the East via the Mount of Olives (Zechariah 14:4).

As the original teller, perhaps Matthew’s “MIT” is the fulfillment of prophecy. Try telling the story keeping this in mind. How can you make the significance of this fulfillment clear ?

Sometimes (often?) deciphering the MIT does not happen until you’ve already internalized the story…keep at it! Of course, the MIT you choose today, may not be the MIT you will choose the next time you tell the story!

LEARNING by HEART

Here is a copy of the story: Matthew 21

For all ages:

Map it out! Take a piece of paper and mark out where all the people/places are in your mind. Now, where are you, the storyteller? Tell the story with your “map” in mind.

For the younger set:

Play it out! Get out any kind of figures (as always, even salt and pepper shakers will do). Have someone read the story while the kids move the pieces…now switch roles. Once you’ve done this a few times, put your “script” down and just tell the story!

WONDER WORDS

Hosanna: The word “hosanna” is translated as “save, please.” In this story, “hosanna” is used as a greeting of praise.

Prophet: noun
1 : one who declares publicly a message that one believes has come from God or a god
2 : one who foretells future events
(from Miriam-Webster “Student” dictionary online: www.wordcentral.com)

MORE TO TELL

  Check back here for a short clip in which Jeff Krehbiel tells us about his own storytelling practices in worship.